SEARS Roebuck Elsmore Model at 3630 GlendaleMilford Rd. in Evendale, Oh

This post was originally published by Laraine Shape on November 26, 2013

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The other day I was zooming down GlendaleMilford Rd. when I spotted a cluster of porch pillars out of the corner of my eye. A Sears house!

Turns out it’s a beautiful SEARS Roebuck Elsmore model complete with distinctive 5 piece eave brackets, original porch rail and Sears front door. SWEET!  Definitely no mistaking this one. It’s the real deal. Another one recently came available for sale in Wyoming and sold very quickly. In 3 days to be exact and for $2000 more than asking price.

The Elsmore was billed by Sears as ” a popular, inexpensive and graceful bungalow, well lighted and ventilated.”   Click here to see the original catalog image of this home.

Unfortunately the owner wasn’t home when I stopped to take pictures. Maybe next time. I’d love to see the inside

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Distinctive front door
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Porch pillars and rail
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Sears distinctive five piece eave bracket

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Recently sold Sears Elsmore model at 1540 Maple Ave., Wyoming, Oh

 

 

 

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The Door that Sears Built – But What About the House?

This post was originally published by Laraine Shape on November 21, 2013

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Okay, this one is going to haunt me. The house across the street from it is a Sears kit home – no doubt about it. It’s a 1924 built Americus model and as distinctive as it can be. The Americus is at 51 Hereford St. in Hartwell, Ohio.

But what about this one? At 62 Hereford St? The distinctive front door is just like the one displayed in the Sears Building Materials catalog. Could this be a Sears house, too?

 

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I’m not familiar with a Sears model that looks like this, but that door!!

The owner was nice enough to let me in for a look inside and, after gasping over the original windows, doors and trim and a brief explanation of what a Sears Kit house is, we made a trek down to the basement to see what we could see.

Not a mark to be found…dang! But the floor joists and support beams look just like what’s under a typical Sears house. Solid as a rock.

Fortunately there have been other Sears house lovers before me that have suffered the same conundrum. Here’s an example of it on the Sears Archives FAQ section.

“I was told my 1912/1913 home is a Sears model home, but I really do not see any indication of this fact. It is a two story house with a large bay window that runs all the way up on one side and a porch in front. I have not seen any Sears homes with bay windows like this. The front door is thought to be original and has a large oval beveled glass cutout. I have heard from the local people that this door is one of the indicators that this is a Sears home. I can not imagine how the long running rumor that this is a Sears home started. I have looked for markings and found none. The bottoms of the floorboards in the basement are stamped Kaul Ind. (I am assuming this stands for Kaul Industries). If you have any insight on any of this I would love to hear it. “—Angie Piper 3/4/03

Answer: “Your house could have come from Sears. Buyers could submit their own architectural plans to Sears and the Modern Homes division would create a house from that design and sell the materials for the house.

Keep in mind that Sears Modern Homes were not innovative house designs. Sometimes people think a house is a Sears Modern Home when in fact it is not.

Sears sold doors, windows, and other building materials through a variety of Sears catalogs including a building supplies catalog. It is possible that the door or other parts of your house was originally purchased from Sears.”

The house at 62 Hereford doesn’t appear in any of the model catalogs that I’m aware of but it sure has the feel of a Sears home. According to hearsay, the original owner built the house himself and two others on either side of it for his kids.

If nothing else, I had the pleasure of meeting a really nice homeowner who is living in a beautiful home with his wife and two year old and who was willing to share his treasure with someone who appreciates the quality and workmanship of an old home. An old home that may or may not be a Sears home.

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51 Hereford St. in Hartwell – Sears Americus model

Slideshow of 62 Hereford St

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NOTES ABOUT THIS POST:

A reader, Ted cochin, commented on Nov. 23, 2013 -Yes that is a Sears Home, the door was a very popular style on all craftsman homes but you can tell by the detail on the porch pillars .

Laraine replied – Hi Ted, Yes the Americus model across from the one in question is DEFINITELY a Sears home – but I absolutely got it dead wrong on the first one. But it was a fun adventure all the same.

 

Sears Roebuck Hathaway Model at 7035 Grace Ave. in Madisonville, Ohio

This post was originally posted by Laraine Shape on November 17, 2013

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Reminiscent of an English cottage, the Sears Hathaway model was a sweet 4 room home with breakfast alcove and bathroom. It was billed by Sears as a “neat design” that will please those who need a smaller house than the one shown on the opposite page (of the Sears Modern Home catalog). “The living room has ample space for piano, davenport, phonograph, table, reading lamp, chairs and other necessary articles of furniture.”

This SEARS Roebuck sweetheart on Grace Avenue was built in 1929 and found by Beatrice Lask during her 1990 survey of Sears Houses in Cincinnati. It has seen some exterior updating in the way of siding, door and window replacement, but still maintains her original lines and charm. Do you suppose the breakfast alcove benches are still present?

Click here to see the Sears Hathaway model as it appeared in the 1923 Modern Home catalog

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Sears Osborn Model at 1722 Madison Ave. in Mt. Healthy, Ohio

This blog post was originally published on Nov. 13, 2013 by Laraine Shape

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Some days are perfect. Yesterday was one of them.

I got to tour a beautiful Sears Osborn model in Mt. Healthy, chat with its owner, Mary, (one of the nicest people you’d ever care to meet) and enjoy the company of a recently adopted cat who has made himself perfectly at home.

And who wouldn’t? The home has that warm, well loved,cozy feel that seems to be a rarity these days. I enjoyed every minute.

The home was built in 1926 with 2 bedrooms, 1 bath and a side porch. Mary and her husband, Richard, have owned the home since 1974.

The fireplace was placed on the left side as you enter the living room rather than the right as shown on the old Osborn plans (the original glass doors have been replaced on the bookshelves).

Many of the original features remain although there have been significant changes including; porch enclosure, kitchen remodel and the addition of a 3rd bedroom, informal eating area and deck at the rear of the house. A rough stucco finish was added to the living room walls to give it a more “adobe” like feel. Lighting fixtures have been replaced (although the original dining room chandelier is in a box in the basement), wood and some hardware has been painted and carpet is covering the original hardwood floors, something Mary would love to change but hasn’t been able to convince her husband to do because he loves the feel of carpet.

All in all the home has retained the majority of its original integrity and it was an absolute pleasure to see.

And yes! We found blue grease pencil marks in the basement.  Click here for an explanation of by Sears Home expert, Rose Thornton, of how these got there.

Click here to see the original Sears Osborn model with floor plan

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Notes about this post

Laraine started blogging about Sears Houses at the end of October 2013.  After only two weeks, she had visited quite a few homes in her area, and even got inside several houses for personal tours.

If you have been following along, you will see that in several of her blogs up to this point, Laraine referenced Rosemary Thornton and links to her website.  Laraine also had links to Rose’s books about Sears Houses on her website.

But on Nov 12., 2013, Rose made a comment on one of Laraine’s previous blogs, about a house that Laraine thought might be a custom Sears Home.  Rose clearly stated that the house was not from Sears, and gave an indication of what it might be, in the opinion of another Sears fanatic, Rachel Shoemaker.

If you follow Sears Houses at all on the internet, you will find numerous references to these two women, who both have websites about Sears, and other kit houses.  They also are administrators of what they refer to as “a large closed group” on Facebook.  I myself, was a member (and for a time, an Admin) in that Facebook group, until I left due to the tone and commentary within that group.

Since I had maintained contact with quite a few other Sears researchers who were still in the group, I heard pretty quickly that someone had shared a link to Laraine’s blog about the possible custom house.  Not only was Laraine ridiculed for her blog post in the group at that time,  but Rachel, specifically, would continue to bring up the post for further insults over a period of time.  Rose was happy to join in the conversations condemning Laraine’s blog and research.

This type of commentary within that group was not new.  Over the years that I was a member, this type of thing would happen over and over again.  Apparently, those two women are under the impression that they, and ONLY they, are knowledgeable and capable of speaking about Sears Houses, which is surely not the case.

Laraine, herself, was unfazed by the criticism she received, after being told about it, but went on to do many more blogs of her own about the Sears Houses in Cincinnati.  She did, however, remove ads to Rose Thornton’s books from her website, and would never add links to her website again.

Sears Avalon Model at 196 Fleming Rd. in Wyoming, Ohio

This blog post was originally published on Nov. 8, 2013 by Laraine Shape

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If ever there was a sweet Sears Modern Home, the Avalon model is it. And here is a perfect example of one at 196 Fleming Rd. in Wyoming, Ohio…perched on a gorgeous rolling, treed setting of nearly 1 acre. The current owner has lived in the home since 1987 and had the good fortune of attending one of Beatrice Lask’s lectures at the Wyoming Historical
Society in 1991. Beatrice was Cincinnati’s Sears Kit Home expert and was responsible for unearthing nearly 500 of them in the early 1990′s as part of her Master’s Degree thesis project.

This home on Fleming was built in 1926 and is in pristine condition. It consists of 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, living room, dining room and kitchen. The original Sears model was billed as having 3 bedrooms and as being “warm and cozy enough for any part of the country.” The porch on this home is an absolute delight.

I’d love to see the inside details of this home. Maybe I’ll get lucky one of these days and the two adorable little “guard” dogs will let me into their domain for a few minutes.

1920 catalog

Sears Vallonia Model in Madisonville, Ohio

This post was originally published on Nov. 7, 2013 by Laraine Shape

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Sears Vallonia at 6813 Bramble Ave

Here’s an example of a Sears Vallonia model in Madisonville, Ohio. Billed as a “real prize bungalow,” the Vallonia was one of, if not THE, most popular kit home models offered by Sears. It was available from 1921 until 1940 and consisted of 4 bedrooms, (2 down and 2 up) plus an upstairs sewing room, 1 bathroom, living room, dining room and kitchen. We have lots of these old Vallonia treasures here in the Cincinnati area.  Click here to see the original Sears catalog offering of this delightful bungalow.

The Croatan Cottage in Manteo, North Carolina is a beautiful example of a Sears Vallonia restored to its former glory.  Click here to see a fun blog (with photos) about this beautiful home.

The photos below highlight some of the original Sears Kit Home features in this Cincinnati Vallonia which has been converted into office quarters.

Want to buy and restore a Sears Vallonia model? Call me! I can help you find and negotiate a price on one.

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The Lockland Twins – Sears Josephine Models at 405 and 407 W. Wyoming Ave. in Lockland, Ohio

This post was originally published on Nov. 6, 2013 by Laraine Shape

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The Lockland Twins – Sears Josephine Models at 405 and 407 W. Wyoming Ave. in Lockland, Ohio

Here’s a pair of Sears twins in Lockland – Josephine models. Aren’t they cute? They belong to the Church of Christ in Lockland, Ohio. They sit side by side on W. Wyoming Ave., the main drag that runs east and west between Wyoming and Lockland. The main church is next door, to the right, as you face these Sears houses. One was built in 1924 (407) and its sister at 405 was built in 1931 – seven years later. Both houses consist of 2 bedrooms and 1 bath. The Sears catalog offering promises “You will like the Josephine the longer you live in it.”  Click here to see the original Sears catalog offering

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